Santa Maria High School sees a large turnout for class elections

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Amid distance learning and virtual classrooms, a significant number of sophomore and junior students at Santa Maria High School have put their names in the race for student elections.

A record-breaking 20 freshman students are running for president for the upcoming online election, a first for the school. According to Santa Maria Joint Union High School District spokesperson Kenny Klein, the elections will involve about 90 percent of the student body or nearly 3,000 students.

POSITIVE ENGAGEMENT A large number of freshman and junior-aged students at Santa Maria High School put their hat in the running for student elections this school year. - PHOTO COURTESY OF KENNY KLEIN
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF KENNY KLEIN
  • POSITIVE ENGAGEMENT A large number of freshman and junior-aged students at Santa Maria High School put their hat in the running for student elections this school year.
Students campaigning for a position, have done so via Zoom and social media. Voting moved to a digital format and students are casting their votes via Google forms. Official voting days ran from Thursday, Nov. 5, to Friday, Nov. 6, at 3 p.m.



According to a press release, freshman and vice presidential candidate Denise Delgado said she’s excited to be campaigning this week and hopes to be elected as Class of 2024 vice president.

“I think that [COVID-19] has made us more creative in the way we run elections. Technology has allowed for a major increase in participation,” Delgado said.

Four times the number of students than usual are on the ballot this year, Klein said activity director and ASB advisor Adrian Salazar told him.

For the Class of 2024, 11 students are running for president, four for vice president, one for treasurer, and four for chief justice. For the Class of 2022, five students are vying for president, four for vice president, three for secretary, four for treasurer, and four for chief justice.

Salazar told New Times that a neat feature of Google forms is that it tallies the votes for the user. He just had to create the ballot and share the link with students.

“In order to reduce the possibility of fraud, all students must submit matching information, such as a school email that includes their six-digit student number, and must write their full name as it appears on their identification card,” he said.


The entries will be checked against a master list of students to verify that the student is a member of the class. Directions are very specific, Salazar said, and state that if the information doesn’t match records, the vote won’t count.

Election results are slated to be released Monday, Nov. 9, by 3 p.m. ∆



—Karen Garcia

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