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Love inspires North County artists

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Husbands and wives. Brothers and sisters. Sons and fathers. Moms and daughters. Man and dog. Love is the common theme connecting them all.

"There are many forms of love," Atascadero artist Nathan Doster said. "There is the love between family members, presumably between spouses, of parents, of grandparents, as well as for and from the child."

PURE Love, Always captures a tender moment between photographer Trisha Butcher's son and dog. - PHOTO COURTESY OF TRISHA BUTCHER
  • Photo Courtesy Of Trisha Butcher
  • PURE Love, Always captures a tender moment between photographer Trisha Butcher's son and dog.

Doster's art, along with works from other members of the Paso Robles Art Association, is currently on display at Studios on the Park as part of the Love show.

Doster's piece, Extended Family and Child, is a fused glass piece made of delicate bowls that each represent different family members, each a vessel of its own unique experiences.

"The piece speaks to many forms of love, all of which are important," Doster said. "Between the larger forms are smaller ones, representing the flow of respect, love, and wisdom passed between the family members."

Paso Robles photographer Trisha Butcher took a more representational approach in her depiction of love in art. She shot both of her photos at Cayucos beach, a favorite local spot for Butcher. A sweet moment is showed in Love, Always, as Butcher's son and dog embrace in a hug on the sandy beach. And Summer Lovin' showcases vivid, beautiful hues of orange, red, and yellow, as the sun sets in Cayucos.

"Love kind of encompasses everything," Butcher said. "Two of the things I love most: my son and my dog. And those sunsets; I can never get enough."

TOGETHER Extended Family and Child is a fused glass piece by Atascadero artist Nathan Doster. - PHOTO COURTESY OF NATHAN DOSTER
  • Photo Courtesy Of Nathan Doster
  • TOGETHER Extended Family and Child is a fused glass piece by Atascadero artist Nathan Doster.

While Doster sees his glass and ceramics work as purely decorative, he acknowledges that others can see it as more functional, with one admirer even buying a piece specifically to eat cereal out of.

"Most will look at the piece and think, 'Huh, a stack of pretty bowls, and one that he forgot to pile onto the stack,' and move on to the next piece in the show," Doster said. "Maybe they will think about their own extended family and how it is interrelated. Maybe they will think about their influence on their children. Maybe it will make them hungry for a bowl of Cheerios." Δ

Arts Writer Ryah Cooley loves her partner, Spencer, her pit bulls, Lola and Hercules, and all things glitter. This is her last arts story for New Times, but send arts story tips to Assistant Editor Peter Johnson at pjohnson@newtimesslo.com.

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