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The primary difference

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The primary has officially come and gone. Here’s how people voted:

• In the U.S. Senator race, Democratic incumbent Barbara Boxer secured more than 80 percent of her party’s vote and will go on to face Republican businesswoman Carly Fiorina in the November election. Fiorina won 56 percent of the GOP vote, over Brian Quintana’s 14 percent.

• In the 33rd District State Assembly race, sole Democrat Hilda Zacarias won her party’s nomination and will face Katcho Achadjian, who received 42 percent of the vote over opponent Matt Kokkonen’s 27 percent and Etta Waterfield’s 26 percent.

• Both incumbents in the 22nd and 23rd District U.S. representative primaries ran unopposed in their respective parties. Republican Rep. Kevin McCarthy will run unopposed for the 22nd District in November, while Democratic Rep. Lois Capps will run against Republican Tom Watson, who received 30 percent of the GOP nomination.

• Current 2nd District County Supervisor Bruce Gibson skated to an easy win over challenger Marshall Ochylsky for the nonpartisan position. Gibson took 69 percent of the vote over Ochylsky’s 29 percent.

• The 4th District County Supervisor race wasn’t so easy. In the office vacated by Achadjian’s bid for state assembly, Arroyo Grande attorney Mike Zimmerman took the close three-way battle with 37 percent over Paul Teixeira’s 32 percent and current Arroyo Grande Mayor Pro Tem Jim Guthrie’s 30 percent.

• In the hotly contested sheriff’s election, the night ended with SLO Police Captain Ian Parkinson attracting 40 percent of voters, far short of the 51 percent needed to avoid a runoff in November. In a late night surprise, retired Pismo Beach police chief Joe Cortez jumped past retired SLO Police sergeant and former county supervisor Jerry Lenthall, securing Cortez’s spot on the November ballot. Cortez received 18 percent and Lenthall 16 percent in the close race.

• Current Morro Bay City Council member Betty Winholtz and former mayor William Yates will face each other in the fall runoff for the city mayor. Winholtz earned 34 percent of the vote to Yates’ 32 percent.  All four candidates vying to fill two vacant spaces in the city council will continue on to the fall election.

• A number of local county administrative incumbents went unchallenged. County Assessor Tom Bordonaro, Jr.; Auditor-Controller Gere W. Sibbach; County Clerk-Recorder Julie Rodewald; District Attorney Gerald Shea; School Superintendent Julian Crocker; and Treasurer-Tax Collector Frank Freitas will remain at their posts. With this election, Shea will become the county’s longest-serving district attorney in more than half a century.

• Statewide, the race for governor played out as many expected. Republican billionaire Meg Whitman secured her party’s nomination, beating out Steve Poizner 64 percent to 27 percent. Democrat Jerry Brown whomped his opponents with 84 percent. For lieutenant governor, Republican Abel Maldonado, who currently holds the seat, won his party’s nomination with 43 percent, and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom won the Democrats’ nod with 55 percent of the vote.

• On the statewide propositions, Proposition 13, which sets statewide standards for seismic retrofit projects, passed with 84 percent.

• Proposition 14, which reforms the way voters can cast votes in primary elections, eked by with 54 percent.

• The other electoral-related initiative on the ballot, Proposition 15, which would have repealed a ban on public funding of political campaigns, lost 57 percent to 43 percent.

• Proposition 16, the PG&E-backed constitutional amendment that would have made it nearly impossible for local communities to set up nonprofit electric services, failed to pass; 52 percent of voters rejected the measure. PG&E spent a whopping $46 million of ratepayer funds to pass the proposition.

• Proposition 17, which was backed by Mercury Insurance, would have overturned a state law prohibiting insurance companies from considering a driver’s insurance history when setting rates. It narrowly lost 52 percent to 48 percent.

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